Monday, March 12, 2012

Even More French Vintage . . . .


Here's a little more of my French Vintage project, the pattern by ThimbleCreek Quilt Shop.


The last border of blocks has an even darker background fabric than the first two sets of blocks.


All that's left is to piece the sashing and connect those blocks.

After my last post I got several questions about this project, the most popular question was how do I get such a neat block and would I post a picture of the back of one of my blocks.


As you can see, I press all my seams open. I think it makes the blocks lay flatter and helps me see all the seams to get everything properly aligned before I sew my seam.

Another thing I always do is make my half square triangle units larger then square them up. I think if you start with wonky hsts you end up with a wonky block. I still use the Easy Angler 2, but I just make them about 1/4" larger.

The most important thing about my blocks is my accurate 1/4" seam allowance. I can't take credit for it, my machine has a 1/4" foot that never lets me down. Additionally, my machine feeds the fabric through the machine from the top and the bottom, some machines only feed from the bottom. I think the dual feed machines help the fabric flow through straight, creating a perfect seam.

As to the fabric, the only French General fabric that I'm using is the background fabric for the last round of blocks. It is from the Panier de Fleurs line and the number is 13593.

The background fabric for the center four blocks is from Lily & Will by Bunny Hill Designs, #2807.

The background fabric for the second round of blocks is Puzzle Pieces by Moda,
#1008.

The majority of my grays came from Lily & Will and Putting on the Ritz, both by Bunny Hill Designs. My reds are an assortment of scraps and bits and pieces, I couldn't begin to guess their lines or numbers.

Thanks so much for all your comments, feedback, and interest in this project. Out of all the projects I've ever blogged about, this has been one of the most popular. I hope to see French Vintage quilts on your blogs soon, and if you don't have a blog, send me a picture, I'll put it on mine!


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25 comments:

  1. Hi Thelma...I stumbled upon your distinctive quilts via Pinterest and wanted to know more. I enjoyed you sharing your tips in this post....I am now going to immerse myself in more of your work. C

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  2. Wow!!! Gorgeous!! Gorgeous!! GORGEOUS!!! LOL!! ... And it isn't even finished yet!!! Hehe! I am so impressed with this!!! ... And I love seeing your back! Thankyou for showing that you are using 'open' seams ... I actually tried this with a 36-in block (4 x 9in blocks) using 2in squares, this afternoon ... It was a little fiddly getting all those seams sitting right, but once I got the hang of it I was wondering why I hadn't been doing this all along!! So glad to see someone as accomplished as you in this craft, also using this method!!! Thanks!!! ... Can't wait to see how you are going to finish this off, especially how you plan to quilt it!!! Hugs!!

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  3. This quilt is fabulous!! Also, thanks for showing the back of a block. It is not easy to get 1/4" seams pressed open as neatly as yours. Would you please consider showing what steps you take to achieve this? Do you use a full size iron?

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  4. What kind of machine do you have? Lovely quilt.

    Shelia
    sb12041@yahoo.com

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  5. Thank you for sharing your gorgeous quilt in progress and your hints. I "grew up" always pressing the seams to one side, but I may reconsider because your blocks are so perfect!

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  6. This design is growing every time I look at your blog. You are just moving along Thelma. Love the quilt and loved your tips on how to get nice flat, square blocks. We at-home quilters always need ideas on how to improve piecing. Stephani in TX (Tomazec@aol.com)

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  7. Coming along very nicely! I wondered how you pressed your seams, and now we know. The history of quilt seams being pressed to the side was out of necessity, if memory serves. When Great-grandma made her quilts using feathers and any number of items as the "batting" you didn't want those things coming through the seams, hence all seams were pressed to the side. But nowadays I don't think that is much of an issue anymore.

    Your work is wonderful!

    sillysally aka choc chip addict

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  8. Your blocks are as nice on the back as they are on the front! You are absolutely right on about accuracy. If your hst's are wonky, and your 1/4 inch seams are a little off you will never have a nice straight block (or quilt). It's definitely worth it to take care as you sew to get nice results like yours!

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  9. What FUN! Your quilt is amazing and it has been EXTREMELY fun for me to watch it grow! I wanted to tell you that I had heard that "someone" had taken inspiration from the red and white quilt show in NYC to make an incredible red and white quilt using "pieces" of several of the quilts shown. Until now, I did not know that amazing "someone" was YOU! I love what you did. We went to that show and we were likewise inspired - I'm currently working on a red and white quilt and can't wait to finish it!! While I am not a consistent blog reader, I've added yours to my list of FAVES - to the top of the list! THANKS for choosing my French Vintage pattern - it's been overwhelming to see it featured on your blog! Merci Beau Coup!!! joe from ThimbleCreek Quilts :) :)

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  10. I think I am going to try pressing my seams open. Your blocks are so flat!

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  11. I've got to agree...accurate piecing is key to having neat blocks! You don't need to be a perfectionist, just accurate! This is a beautiful work in progress!

    (The "T is for Thelma" pattern arrived in the mail! Thanks again; I can't wait to get busy with it!)

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  12. Thelma,

    It's beautiful as I expected, can't wait to see it done. I've been experimenting with opening the seams as well, sometimes it just works better. What type of sewing machine do you have?

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  13. Really beautiful. I love the progression of grey background tones from light to darker. This will be a quilt you will be so proud to display!

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  14. Judi (Green Fairy Quilts) said you were an incredible piecer and I knew that from seeing your work, but I didn't realize your quilt tops were reversible. Holy crap, that is a tidy block on the reverse.

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  15. The quilt is so lovely! :)
    www.quiltworld2.blogspot.com
    Hugs, Ulla (from Finland)

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  16. It's a stunning quilt so far! Thanks for showing us the back of a block - I've never pressed my seams open but I may give it a go!

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  17. It's absolutely divine Thelma! That background for the outside border is perfect! Thanks for the info on the background fabric. I wanted to know but wasn't so sure I should ask, since you have already helped me so much! :)

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  18. Your quilt is really looking fantastic, and like you I like to press my seams open too. I think it really helps a lot and eliminates what I call "hump bumps".

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  19. Thank for showing your technique to a wonderful pieced quilt. I will try pressing my seams open and making half square triangles bigger and then cutting down to size. Thanks for sharing. This is one beautiful quilt.

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  20. It's so pretty! I knew the quilt block back was as pretty as the front :)
    Hugs,
    Donna

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  21. I am just drooling over how beautiful this is turning out! I didn't think anything could top your MGF quilt... except for the last quilt... and the one before that!

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  22. did I mention that the back of your block looks fantastc<3

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  23. Question...you mentioned you use the Easy Angler 2; while rarely used, I own the Easy Angle II....by chance are they the same tool?

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