Friday, March 15, 2013

A few updates . . .

The last time I blogged about this pattern it was to tell you that I was eager to get started on it but that I was searching for the perfect green fabric for the flower stems.




I found the perfect green and here are the fabrics I have selected to make this pattern, from left to right, Battle Hymn by Barbara Brackman for Moda, Darker Battle Hymn by Barbara Brackman for Moda, the red is Lately Arrived from London by Barbara Brackman for Moda, the background fabric is a Moda Solid and the green is by Timeless Treasures and is called Spring.



Once I had the perfect green to go with the rest of the fabrics I just knew this would be my next project.  I got out the pattern to study and rewrite in Thelma-ese, something I always do before I actually start a project, but was disappointed to find out that the handles on the basket and the stems of the flower are appliquéd.  Now I probably should have figured out that those round basket handles were appliquéd before I opened the pattern, but I just didn't really give it any thought.  I thought for sure the stems would be pieced, I don't think I've ever run across a Bonnie Blue/Red Crinoline pattern that had any appliqued pieces.  Which brings up this question, are we allowed to open up a pattern in a shop and read it before we buy it?  I never do because I thought it would look like I was trying to figure out how to make the pattern without buying it.  Had I read this pattern in the shop I don't think I would have bought it.  And now I have all this fabric to make this quilt. I'm going to see if I can find a pieced Carolina Lilly basket block, I have Jenny Beyer's book of pattern blocks that probably has something I can use.  And I'm guessing those round basket handles are just going to be forgotten!  I really thought once I had that green I would be going to town on that project, but not quite yet.

I'm STILL organizing my fabric, from the notes I've been getting it seems like the majority of us have Spring Cleaning Fever.  When I started my fabric reorg I didn't really have a plan, but now that I'm well into it I have refined the process and it's going smoother and faster.

First off, I added more bins, I went from 4 to 8. There's no way I'm going to be keeping 8 bins worth of fabric, each bin holds over 250 fat quarters, I won't do the math, but you get the point, that's a lot of fabric. But having bins that are more empty than full makes adding new fat quarters easier.  I'll be combining some of  the bins once I'm done.



I was spending at least an hour during the day, when the light was the best, cutting, folding and storing the fabric.  I think I mentioned earlier that I'm basically going to a fat quarter system, cutting yardage that won't be used for a border or sashing into fat quarters to add to the fat quarters I already have.

I'm now taking the yardage that I cut into fat quarters and folding them at night, while I watch TV.  I don't need good light for folding.


I then stack the newly folded fat quarters by the bins, so that when I do have good light I can just sort the fabric into the bins by color.  I'm not sure if it's really going faster, or if it just seems like it's going faster, but I feel like I've really made significant progress this week.  I'm almost done cutting the yardage into fat quarters.


And while we're speaking of fabric, playing with all my fabric has made me think about why I have the colors and prints I do, and brings to light the colors that I don't have.  It's been good for me to think more about my fabric, so maybe that's why I found this little helpful hint from Lissa at Moda Lissa, so interesting.  She was talking about solids and said if you want to make a quilt solely from solids, but are not sure how to select your solid colors,  pick a print fabric you like with several colors, pick solids that are in that fabric, then don't use the print fabric, just use the solids.  I thought that was very clever.  She does a better job of explaining the whole thing, read it here if you missed it.

The Fat Quarter Shop has sold all the Thelma Bundles, thank you so much!  You have no idea how worried I was that I would pick a bundle of fabric that no one would be interested in buying.  If you didn't buy your bundle yet, there is one left, and it's free, click here to enter the giveaway at the Jolly Jabber.  You have until March 19th.

Nothing much going on at my house this weekend, I'll be watching basketball, sorting fabric and sewing, sounds pretty perfect really!  Hope you have a pretty perfect weekend too!




Print this post

26 comments:

  1. I have to say you have the neatest fabric reorg I've ever seen! Curious how you're deciding whether a fabric would be good for sashing or binding. I never seem to know until I'm planning a project.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have opened a pattern in a shop before. To make sure I know what I am getting.. If it can be sealed back, like in the zip lock bags. I usually take it to the counter and say I want to check this out, can I open it and see how the handles are done? They always say sure. I would like to know also..

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thelma, I do not believe those handles add a single thing to that pattern. In fact, I find them cluttery and distracting.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I did the Maths! That's enough fat quarters to have in a shop, hehehe. Opening and looking at patterns depends on the quilt shop owner I think. I have done it before. I asked the owner and she was very gracious and allowed me to, because she said she didn't want people being misled and being unhappy with purchases they'd made from her. Please could you show us how you fold your fat quarters? I like how they are square and so neat.

    ReplyDelete
  5. i don't much like the handles on those baskets - i think you should go for cleaner lines and leave them off ... but i'm not sure how to say that in Thelmaese

    ReplyDelete
  6. applique isn't so bad.. I enjoy the hand work as a break from piecing some times. or you could machine applique.
    Love the colors, love the pattern.. Do agree that the handles on the baskets seem redundant and awkward.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I enjoyed your thoughts on organizing fabric. I'm still doing some of that from my studio re-do in January. It does make you think a lot. I'm getting nearer to being finished and plan to give some away when I get it all sorted and folded. It really does make you think about what you love and why you chose the fabrics you did.

    ReplyDelete
  8. You are extremely organized and I like that--I feel I'm in good company:-D Now, I see how you can easily put fabrics together to make your amazing quilts. XOXO

    ReplyDelete
  9. I just love that Carolina basket pattern This quilt has been on my to do list but also did not realize the applique. You will figure it out Thelma ;-) I will be curious what you come up with. Just look how organized your fabric is getting ! Love it !

    ReplyDelete
  10. I'm impressed with your ability organize -- and with the amount of fabric you have. Wow! Look forward to seeing how you proceed with the Carolina Lily quilt.
    Debbie R.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I was at a quilt show last weekend and Paula was there (she lives in TX so she always has a booth in our Guild show) and I was telling her how I have the Carolina pattern but her kits were sold out online. Well, she had tons of the kits there. I already had swooped one up when she said - you should look at the show special before you commit. She had the Ship Shape kit for 25% off! I didn't expect to love it - it was in APQ last year, but seeing the quilt there and touching it... I put the other kit back and grabbed the Ship Shape one. It is SOOOOOO gorgeous. Anyway... I was a bit hesitant on the applique stems too (I'm almost 90% sure I'm dropping the handles) but this weekend, after the show, I started working on some miniature baskets from another kit I picked up at the show and they tackle the applique handles in a very interesting manner. They basically do a circle with the bias strip and lay it on the center of a square, then after you applique it (I did it on my machine), you cut the square in half. Wala! you have two triangles with the basket handles already in place. Keeps the applique more stable and the triangle more accurate. I was thinking I would do that with the blocks on this one.
    I had to laugh when you said you wouldn't keep 8 bins of fabric... I thought - Why Not?
    Hope you enjoy your weekend!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Eight bins really isn't that much. I've seen people with way more than that!!!!!

    Have a fun weekend! I'm off to a quilt show today!

    ReplyDelete
  13. i had a lg project quilt that had a long applique stem running the length i used fusible bias tape and just stitched it dow last its great and comes in lots of colors

    ReplyDelete
  14. Love your stash! Your colors play very nicely with each other :) oh and congrats on selling out of your bundle, that was a great selection!

    ReplyDelete
  15. I'm with the others in saying just leave the curved handles off. I hardly noticed them...lol
    As for opening a pattern. If I'm looking at one, and not sure if its going to "get me in trouble", I always open it. Of course its only patterns that open without tearing into it...
    I like to see what I'm getting into before I pay 9-12$ for one...
    Take care...fold on
    Gael

    ReplyDelete
  16. I really like the fabric you chose for the Carolina Lily pattern so I hope you find a way to complete the blocks! I actually enjoy applique and other hand sewing while I watch tv with my husband. I'd leave the handles off but think you could tackle those stems. You could also machine applique the stems. I can't wait to see what you decide to do.

    ReplyDelete
  17. You can machine sew the applique if you are not into hand sewing. If you like the pattern, please don't give up. It may just end up being something you enjoy.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I know a lot of people who steer clear of the "A" word and I was one of them. I tried 4 different methods of applique in classes and finally found the one that I love! I'm not saying I do a lot of applique but I do love it when I do it and wonder why I don't do more. I think, with your attention to detail and expert piecing skills that adding applique to your repertoire is a must! Really, try it and you might wonder why it took you so long!

    As for opening patterns, I've been disappointed in patterns more often than not because of poor explanations and feel I have the right to open them to inspect them before I buy. I, of course, replace it in the container and put it back exactly the way I found it. Happy quilting!!

    ReplyDelete
  19. In response to your question about patterns, here goes... I work at a shop and think that if you approach somebody that works there, maybe saying, "can I see how they do this, or what size something is" it will probably not be a problem. It is hard for stores since they order patterns not being able to see directions. We totally understand sometimes a great pattern has bad directions or problems. On the flip side we deal with people reading to try to retain patterns in their head or worse taking pictures of them, which only leads to hesitance to let people look. Approaching with honesty is always the best and easiest!
    I agree with the others that say to leave the handles off. Try a block that way and see how you like it!

    ReplyDelete
  20. I love this pattern and seriously thought about ordering it too. The basket I am sure you will make your way and it will be wonderful....the whole block could be pieced and I am sure you figured it out already
    If I make this quilt I will change the setting I am not fond of the setting , maybe its her fabric choices but I think it overpowers the baskets of flowers!
    have fun and can't wait to see a block! this weekend I am folding and refolding fabric as we had what used to be the "toy and game" closet painted is now my fabric closet so organizing it today and packing away toys that haven't been out of that walk in closet in years!
    Kathie

    ReplyDelete
  21. Thelma,
    I barely noticed those handles on the baskets---I'd leave them off if I were you. That fabric will be great together!

    ReplyDelete
  22. I work in a quilt shop and if a customer asks to look inside a pattern, I am okay with that--as long as she doesn't start taking notes!
    I'm not sure if I've ever seen a Carolina Lily without appliqued stems. When I have an applique project with lots of stems or handles, I make tons of them before hand using my Karen Kay Buckley Perfect Stems tools. Then they are a snap to sew into place by hand or by machine using Kim Diehl's technique as I make the blocks. Go for it!!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Thelma, if you look at this link you will see my great grandmother's Carolina Lily quilt. It has no handles!!! http://lalaslovelys.blogspot.ca/p/great-grandma-genevieves.html

    ReplyDelete
  24. Hi Thelma, I just spent over 1/2 hour on Judi's blog (green fairy quilts) with my jaw on the floor, looking at your Evening Blooms quilt. Oh my word...with your piecing and applique skills and Judi's Longarm quilting skills, it is beautiful beyond description. It totally takes my breath away. I so hope you will be putting it is some quilt shows because it is definitely a ribbon winner. Wasn't this your first applique project? Big Hugs...

    ReplyDelete
  25. Gorgeous work, thank you for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Regarding your querry whether it would be OK to open a pattern in a quilt shop. Ask. SHop ownwers dislike your assuming it is OK. Ask if they know whether the pattern has an applique or whatevr in it. They often can save you the time as they know or have made the pattern or will say go ahead. If they are negative and not helpful do you really want to buy from that shop? I find most owners great if you ask

    They are there to make money and also make you a new or returning customer. I have worked and run some quilt stores over the years so this is my opinion and experience. Your redo is fun twist on the the Lily

    ReplyDelete

I try to respond to all my comments but sometimes I just don't get the job done. Please know that I am reading your comments and appreciate you taking the time to add a little of yourself to my blog.